Iodine – the secret of the seaside climate

Every year, thousands, of Poles go the Baltic seaside to benefit from this valuable chemical element. Health resort patients, tourists, families – everyone wants to breathe the iodine-saturated air hoping that it will bring them health and wellness. But what’s the deal with iodine?

Iodine – the secret of the seaside climate Nad polskim morzem

fot. Mateusz Grochocki

Iodine deficiency is a problem all over the world. In 1997 a decision was taken in Poland to add iodine to salt to prevent various diseases, to which the inhabitants of the Southern parts of the country were especially vulnerable. It turns out that this element influences the functioning of many of our interior organs. It is closely connected with the thyroid, which produces hormones responsible for metabolic processes, the growth and the functioning of muscles (including the heart), as well as the reproductive system, protein synthesis, development and proper activity of the brain and the functioning of the nervous system.

As it turns out – iodine is very important for our health. People with iodine deficiency are more prone to stress, easily tired and irritable. You can also tell someone’s iodine intake by the state of their hair, skin and nails. It also influences children’s ability to concentrate and learn, as well as their psychological and physical development.

It may be found in abundance in sea water, and foods grown on iodine-rich soils. Also, you can find iodine in sea fish, unrefined or iodised salt, sea food and yeast. And if you still want more, we suggest going the Polish sea.

Pregnant women and small children have been recommended trips to the sea-side for centuries. Even hundreds of years ago, people already knew that iodine is good for them, as the air at the seaside visibly improved everyone’s health. The secret is the high content of iodine in water, which evaporates and saturates the air with it. That is why the water, the soil and the air at the seaside area are so rich in iodine. Please note that the closer to the sea, the more iodine.

Unfortunately, only a thin 5-7 km strip of the sea shore in Poland has increased iodine content in the air. Also, as the Baltic is a cold sea, it does not give off enormous amounts of iodine into the atmosphere. This does not mean, however, that the tales of the boons of the Baltic seaside walks are all made up. Such walks are great for overall well-being, and they reinforce the treatment of diseases connected with iodine deficiency. Therefore, one should use any opportunity available to go to the Baltic. If, however, you don’t get the chance to go, you can always try a salt cave. Even a short séance, a temporary substitute for a stay at the seaside, will make up for the absence of holidays and ensure respite.

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